What is Lupus?

Lupus is a chronic (marked by long duration or frequent recurrence) inflammatory disease that can affect various parts of the body, including joints, skin, kidneys, and blood. Lupus is in the class of autoimmune system illnesses. In a healthy body, the immune system normally makes antibodies to protect against bacteria , viruses, and other foreign materials (called antigens). In an autoimmune illness such as lupus, the immune system loses its ability to tell the difference between foreign substances and its own cells and tissues. When this happens, the immune system begins making antibodies against it's own body. These antibodies are called autoantibodies and react with the antigens to form immune complexes. These immune complexes build up in the tissue.

  • LUPUS IS NOT CANCER.
  • LUPUS IS NOT CONTAGIOUS.
  • LUPUS IS NOT RARE.

There are 3 Types of Lupus

Systemic
Lupus Erythematosus
,
the most commonly diagnosed type of lupus, can affect the skin, joints lungs kidneys, heart, blood vessels, nervous system and brain. According to National Lupus Foundation's estimates, 70% of lupus cases are systemic, and in half of these cases a major organ will be involved.

Discoid
Lupus
Cutaneous

or skin is limited to the skin and is identified by a rash that may appear on the face, the scalp or neck. The National Lupus Foundation estimates 10% of all cases of lupus are discoid.

Drug
Induced
Lupus

occurs after the use of certain prescribed drugs where symptoms appear that are similar to systemic lupus. Most common drugs connected with this form of lupus are hydralazine (used to treat blood pressure or hypertension), and procainamide (used to treat irregular heart rhythms). Lupus symptoms usually fade when the medications are discontinued.

 










© 2013 Lupus Foundation of Southern Arizona   |   4602 E. Grant Road, Tucson, AZ 85712   |   877.822.9006 TOLL-FREE    |   520.622.9006   |   Privacy Policy                                            WebDesign: PDG